Wendy Davis

Born:May 16, 1963 (age 55)
Career:Texas state senator, 2009-2015
Fort Worth City Council, 1999-2008
State:TX
Party:Democratic
Education:B.A., Texas Christian University
J.D., Harvard Law School
Website:http://www.wendydavisforsenate.com/

Wendy Davis served as a Texas state senator from 2009 to 2015, and was the 2014 Democratic nominee for Texas governor but lost in the general election.

Davis was born on May 16, 1963 in West Warkwick, Rhode Island. Her family moved to Texas when she was 11 years old. She earned a bachelor of arts in English from Texas Christian University and a law degree from Harvard Law School.

Davis served a federal clerkship from 1993 to 1994, then joined the Fort Worth office of Haynes & Boone in 1994. In 1999, she became part owner of Safeco Title Co., which was later acquired by Republic Title. She became chief executive officer of Republic Title's Fort Worth Division in 2004, where she served until 2009. Davis now partners with Brian Newby in Newby Davis, PLLC, and holds an of counsel position at Cantey Hanger LLP. Her current practice includes federal and local governmental affairs, litigation, economic development, contract compliance and real estate matters.

Davis served on the Fort Worth City Council from May 1999 to January 2008, when she assumed office as a Texas state senator, representing District 10. In the Senate, she was the vice-chair on the Senate Select Committee on Open Government, and a member of the Senate Committee on Economic Development, the Senate Committee on Transportation, and the Veteran Affairs and Military Installations Committee. She previously served on the Senate Committee for Education and as vice-chair on the Senate Committee on International Relations and Trade.

On June 25, 2013, Davis's eleven-hour-long filibuster in the Texas Senate helped to delay passage of Senate Bill 5, which included restrictive abortion regulations, beyond the deadline for the legislative session and gave Davis considerable national attention.

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