Candy Crowley

Born:December 26, 1948 (age 69)
Career:Political correspondent
State:MI
Education:B.A., Randolph-Macon Woman's College
Website:http://iop.harvard.edu/fellows/candy-crowley

Candy Crowley is a political correspondent. She was most recently the anchor of CNN's "State of the Union with Candy Crowley," a political hour of newsmaker interviews and weekly analysis. On Oct 16, 2012, she was the first woman in two decades to moderate a nationally broadcast presidential debate.

Crowley was born December 26, 1948 in Kalamazoo, Michigan. She earned a bachelor's degree in English from Randolph-Macon Woman's College in Lynchburg, Virginia.

Crowley began her broadcast journalism career in Washington, DC, as a newsroom assistant for Metromedia radio station WASH. She has served as an anchor for Mutual Broadcasting and as a general assignment and White House correspondent for the Associated Press, where she covered most of the Reagan era before moving on to NBC-TV to become a general assignment correspondent in its Washington bureau. She came to CNN from NBC News in 1987. Prior to anchoring "State of the Union with Candy Crowley," Crowley served as a congressional correspondent for the network.

In 2005, Crowley was honored with the Edward R. Murrow award and the Joan Shorenstein Barone Award for excellence in journalism for her reporting on the 2004 presidential election. In 2004, she won the Gracie Allen Award in the national news story-series category for "War Stories" and a National Headliner and a Cine award for "CNN Presents: Fit to Kill." In 2003, Crowley won an Emmy for her work on "CNN Presents: Enemy Within." She won the 1999 DuPont-Columbia University Silver Baton Award for her coverage of the impeachment and trial of President Clinton. She won the 2003 and 1998 Dirksen Awards for distinguished reporting on Congress from the National Press Foundation and the 1997 Joan Shorenstein Barone Award for her coverage of Dole's campaign for the presidency. She received the Associated Press Broadcasters' Award for spot news reporting for her coverage of the Reagan campaign. Her reporting on more than a dozen 1992 U.S. Senate campaigns was runner-up for the Joan Shorenstein Barone Award. Crowley also won the Columbia University's Armstrong Award for "Freedom is My Woman," a documentary on a prison cellblock takeover.

Speeches